ACM_Citations
  • United Kingdom-2013

    For contributions to operating systems and networking research.

Experience
None
Education
University of Cambridge, United Kingdom Ph.D., Computer Science (Operating Systems and Networking), November 1995 Diploma in Computer Science (passed with Distinction), August 1990 B.A. Pure Mathematics (2nd class honours), July 1989
Bio
Timothy Roscoe has been a Full Professor in the Systems Group of the Computer Science Department at ETH Zurich since 2007. He works on operating systems, networks, and distributed systems, including the Barrelfish research OS and the Strymon high-performance stream processor for datacenter monitoring. He received a PhD in 1995 from the Computer Laboratory of the University of Cambridge, where he was a principal designer and builder of the Nemesis OS.

After three years working on web-based collaboration systems at a startup in North Carolina, Mothy joined Sprint's Advanced Technology Lab in Burlingame, California in 1998, working on cloud computing and network monitoring, and spent time as an Industrial Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley Computer Science department, working with the Oceanstore project.

He joined Intel Research at Berkeley in April 2002 as a principal architect of PlanetLab, an open, shared platform for developing and deploying planetary-scale services, and worked on Declarative Networking, while becoming an Adjunct Professor at Berkeley.

In September 2006 he spent four months as a visiting researcher in the Embedded and Real-Time Operating Systems group at National ICT Australia in Sydney, which was developing the seL4 microkernel

Since joining ETH Zurich he has also spent time at Microsoft Research, Intel Research, and the University of Washington.

His current research interests include monitoring, modelling, and managing complex enterprise datacenters, system software for modern hardware, and system hardware for modern software. He was named Fellow of the ACM in 2013 for contributions to operating systems and networking research.